Singapore Focus Groups Employee Productivity

Being a member of Focus Groups you would know employee job satisfaction is one of the key goals of all successful companies. Happy employees are more loyal to the company and its vision. They go the extra mile to achieve company goals.

Dissatisfied workers experience lower productivity in the workplace, poorer performance, more job stress, and higher turnover rates. Moreover, low job satisfaction can result in low morale and low loyalty to the company itself and to any outside Focus Groups.

Job satisfaction is defined as the extent to which employees feel self-motivated and satisfied with their job. Employee satisfaction covers the basic concerns and needs of employees, and is essential to the success of any business. Job satisfaction is a combination of intrinsic (kind of work) and extrinsic (working condition) factors. Salary, promotion, work-life balance, recognition and appraisals are important factors to be considered in employee satisfaction.

Best Recruitment And Selection Process

Make strategic decisions to create a culture of engagement and satisfaction. Engaged employees have a strong sense of purpose and leadership. They add value by pushing limits, driving growth and innovation. Employee satisfaction is one of the key metric that can help determine overall health of an organization, which is why many organizations employ regular surveys to measure and track employee satisfaction over time. As a Focus Groups you would understand that this is one way to assess whether your team is happy and engaged at work. It is critical for employee retention. Sadly, CulturalManagement has observed that this has decreased significantly over the past twenty years.

At CulturalManagement we guide you on how to easily collect and understand employee feedback to create an action plan that works. Few ways a company can improve employee job satisfaction:

  • Provide a positive working environment.
  • Rewards and recognition.
  • Make work-life balance a priority.
  • Develop skills and potential of workforce.
  • Create open and honest communication channels.

It's easy to be ethnocentric about customer-centricity! Enthnocentrism is the tendency to look at the world primarily from the perspective of one's own culture. How often do we view customer experience, loyalty, word-of-mouth marketing, and customer care from the perspective of our own company culture? I'd venture to say "too often"!

In the name of customer advocacy, we tend to have a number of exciting customer relationship-building programs in place: advisory boards, user groups, reference programs, satisfaction surveys, experiential marketing, personalized customer communications, and much more. These are indeed useful efforts -- but their usefulness is exponential when we put aside ethnocentrism for true customer-centrism. The key is in examining our motives.

Ethnocentric Customer Advocacy

Inside-out advocacy seeks to build customer relationships through these primary motives: design new products, obtain new customers, up-sell and cross-sell current customers, determine employee bonuses, and so forth. These motivations are ethnocentric because they are essentially self-serving. Sure, the customer may benefit along the way, but the focus is foremost on company revenue. With this focus, the benefits to customers are short-term at best. And the company's outreach efforts must be constant to keep the wheel moving.

True Customer-centric Customer Advocacy

Outside-in advocacy seeks to build customer relationships through these primary motives: make it easier and nicer for customers to get and use the solutions we offer. With those primary motives securely in place, secondary motives may include: design new products, obtain new customers, up-sell and cross-sell current customers, determine employee bonuses, and so forth. The company will certainly benefit along the way, but the focus is foremost on customers' ease. With this focus, the benefits to customers are long-term and self-sustaining. By making it easier and nicer for customers to get and use the solutions we offer, our ambivalent customers are more likely to migrate to brand enthusiasts, positive word-of-mouth accelerates, and both revenue and profit growth are sustainable in an almost auto-pilot mode, relative to the ethnocentric motives scenario.

Waste of Inward Focus

An executive once told me he'd be glad if his company had only manufacturing and sales functions -- just the bare minimum to make and sell solutions for customers. He was really commenting on the excessive inward focus and waste that tends to occur in companies. Certainly, customers expect additional services around the solutions they buy: safety, quality, financing, upgrades and innovations, and so on. And that's why companies exist -- to make and sell whole solutions for customers. After all, it's the customers who make our payroll dollars possible! And truly customer-centric companies keep that thought at the forefront, with pure primary motives to make it easier and nicer for customers to get the solutions they need.

Customer Experience Management

Customer experience management (CEM) is an essential methodology for being a truly customer-centric firm. CEM brings an outside-in focus and pure motives to all groups within the firm. It's the key to creating strong customer perceived differentiation from the competition, as truly customer-centric customer advocacy encompasses the customer's full experience spectrum. CEM makes it easier and nicer for customers to get and use solutions.

Ethnocentric customer-centricity is easy to fall into! Executive champions must be on the alert to prevent it. Outside-in motives prevent waste and and generate big results. The usefulness of any customer relationship building program is exponential when we put aside ethnocentrism for true customer-centrism.

How To Build Resilience At Work

A vendor management system (VMS) promises freedom from the chaos that can be caused by juggling the vast array of components in a staffing supply chain. It does this by pushing everything through a central processing point. Yet the business side of making these transitions can be complicated and disastrous if not well planned. How do you ensure a successful VMS implementation? After spending months with companies and vendors in developing ContractCentral we've learned some valuable lessons about making the transition to vendor management system.

1. Know why you're buying a VMS

Organizations deploy VMS systems for different reasons. Will your VMS foster competitive bidding to lower staffing costs? Speed requisition broadcasts? Reduce the time it takes to find and manage contract workers? You'll save time and money by building a prioritized list of those reasons, understanding must-haves and trade-offs, and using that list to spec, evaluate, plan and build a VMS solution tailored to your business.

2. Establish success metrics up front

How will you define success or failure in your VMS implementation? Identify at least one measure of success for each of the items on your priority list, and develop metrics that enable you to prove the value of the new system. Establishing metrics early, before the project has started, allows you to create and track baselines. These days CFOs are increasingly concerned with making total cost of ownership (TCO) and return on investment (ROI) a central facet of the solution. Establishing a hard dollar value can be tough (be sure to ask prospective vendors for suggestions) but can go a long way toward winning loyal support from senior management.

3. Map VMS against your own business processes

Any major solution implementation can require a few tweaks to your business process as it's deployed. The trick is to prevent tweaks from becoming major process re-engineering (unless, of course, a re-engineering is part of the plan).

Before telecommunications company ADC deployed HotGigs ContractCentral, it studied its existing staffing operations and determined that some re-engineering was necessary. Those changes became an early part of the deployment plan, allowing the team to craft retraining and support strategies to ensure a smooth transition.

4. Understand your costs

The industry rule of thumb says a VMS shouldn't cost more than 1 to 3 percent of your hiring budget, and you can anticipate saving 10 percent to 25 percent of your staffing costs through increased efficiencies and more competitive bidding.However, don't overlook hidden costs. How will your employees manage staffing during the transition? Have you budgeted for retraining your users and participating vendors? Does your contract include post-deployment enhancements? Is there an early penalty for canceling a VMS purchased for a set term?

5. Put yourself in your vendors' shoes

Be realistic about your staffing vendors' costs as well. The higher the cost of integration with your new VMS, or the more deltas there are between their system and yours, the less likely you are to get accurate inputs and prompt responses.

5. Build a training plan

If training is needed, are there online training and support modules available? How much training time will each user need? Are there different views available of the user's desktop in the VMS based on their role and relationship to the system?

6. Plan to scale

One of the greatest success factors of a software application is its rate of adoption with the people who are supposed to use it. If your initial roll out is successful, your users will inevitably begin to use it in new ways, find new reporting requirements...and sooner or later you'll be faced with a need to scale. Make sure your VMS can handle the load without the need for extensive custom-coding, an expensive proposition. In addition, opt for the smartest, most flexible reporting structure possible.