Singapore Focus Groups Employee Productivity

Being a member of Focus Groups you would know employee job satisfaction is one of the key goals of all successful companies. Happy employees are more loyal to the company and its vision. They go the extra mile to achieve company goals.

Dissatisfied workers experience lower productivity in the workplace, poorer performance, more job stress, and higher turnover rates. Moreover, low job satisfaction can result in low morale and low loyalty to the company itself and to any outside Focus Groups.

Job satisfaction is defined as the extent to which employees feel self-motivated and satisfied with their job. Employee satisfaction covers the basic concerns and needs of employees, and is essential to the success of any business. Job satisfaction is a combination of intrinsic (kind of work) and extrinsic (working condition) factors. Salary, promotion, work-life balance, recognition and appraisals are important factors to be considered in employee satisfaction.

Consumer Behavior Model And Research

Make strategic decisions to create a culture of engagement and satisfaction. Engaged employees have a strong sense of purpose and leadership. They add value by pushing limits, driving growth and innovation. Employee satisfaction is one of the key metric that can help determine overall health of an organization, which is why many organizations employ regular surveys to measure and track employee satisfaction over time. As a Focus Groups you would understand that this is one way to assess whether your team is happy and engaged at work. It is critical for employee retention. Sadly, CulturalManagement has observed that this has decreased significantly over the past twenty years.

At CulturalManagement we guide you on how to easily collect and understand employee feedback to create an action plan that works. Few ways a company can improve employee job satisfaction:

  • Provide a positive working environment.
  • Rewards and recognition.
  • Make work-life balance a priority.
  • Develop skills and potential of workforce.
  • Create open and honest communication channels.

There's an old supply-chain saying that goes, 'A vendor gives you the best 'deal,' while a strategic partner gives you the highest quality at the lowest cost.' This adage sets the stage for this article on Strategic Supplier Relationships ('SSR') also known as Supplier Relationship Management ('SRM'). SSR is defined as a comprehensive approach to managing the interactions and communications between an enterprise and its suppliers. The goal of SSR is to effectively streamline and make more efficient the communication and interaction between an enterprise and its suppliers. This is accomplished through increased process efficiency related to the acquiring of goods and services, the managing of inventory, purchase order processing, and the management of materials. The benefits of SSR are lower costs, less administrative burden, increased productivity, and a more integrated supply-chain. With margins within the food industry being squeezed, it is ever so important to manage COGS (cost of goods sold) aggressively, thereby increasing profitability. The objective of this article is to shed some light on how SSR might reduce costs and administrative burden, while increasing margins. There are well published examples of companies using SSR to enhance the strategic relationship between buyers and suppliers. In essence, SSR can be accomplished by following these rules of engagement:

1. Carefully evaluate and choose strategic suppliers. When choosing a strategic partner, be sure to take a close look at their business, including such things as:

- Financial stability (D&B)

- Client references

- Proximity to your network

- Management depth

- Years in business

- Use of technology (EDI)

- Cultural fit

2. Develop a clear set of expectations. Before signing an agreement with a supplier, be sure there are clear rules and expectations, including specific tasks you demand them to accomplish. There must be clear roles and nothing must be left to interpretation in terms of responsibilities.

3. Define goals and performance targets. Specific key performance indicators (KPI's) must be developed and tracked to compare suppliers and keep them on track. KPI's such as on-time delivery, expected lead time, freight terms, etc. must be included in a quarterly report-card for each supplier. When setting targets for performance, use the SMART method for developing goals. Each goal must be:

Specific,

Measurable,

Attainable,

Realistic, and

Timely

4. Monitor and rank supplier performance. It's always a good idea to use a scorecard to monitor supplier performance. Additionally, ranking suppliers from best to worst and sharing this data will go a long way to improve performance (nobody wants to be at the bottom of the report).

5. Conduct annual reviews for continuous improvement. Finally, be sure to meet with your suppliers to solicit ideas on how to improve productivity, reduce administrative burden, increase the use of technology, and lower costs.

Conclusion

A comprehensive strategic supplier management program will result in a significant reduction in administrative burden, lower cost of goods, and ultimately, improved profitability. The first step is to establish the baseline of existing suppliers in terms of volumes, frequency, and costs. Next, develop a clear set of expectations, goals, and key performance indicators to monitor quarterly. Finally, be sure to meet with your strategic partners frequently to pick their brains about ways to improve productivity or reduce costs. Additionally, be sure you spend some time teaching your suppliers about the culture at your company and the strategic plans for growth. When taken seriously, the steps outlined in this article will not only improve supplier relationships and lower costs, but will also have a positive impact on profitability. So, remember, vendors are things of the past; strategic partners are what make a difference!

Consumer Markets And Consumer Buyer Behavior

While most companies talk about consumer friendliness, customer centricity, customer relationship etc. more often than not they are mere lip service or jargons with little sincerity behind these grand sounding words.

When a company lacks the sincerity to deal with their customers fairly, some one comes along and puts the company on the dock and though the trial by the customers may be long drawn out it is ultimately the death sentence for the brand or the organizations itself many a times.

There are hundreds of recorded cases of companies going down the tube in spite of the best possible product and high visibility promotions just because they failed to take care of the customers in all sincerity.

Jeremy dorosin and the Starbucks is a case in point where one single customer created a movement and media attention so wide that the company had to close shop.

Starbucks coffee simply refused to acknowledge the genuine grievance of a customer and laughed him off. In spite of their claims of people oriented service, they failed to note a genuine customer complaint. When Jeremy Dorosin went to the media and the internet, millions of affected customer whether of starbucks or other companies joined in to orchestrate their protest against the high handedness of big business? The unfairness was visible when Starbucks painted Jeremy Dorosin as a nut.

The company had to close shop ultimately and we now have the famous term Starbucked out of this customer victory.

Just do a search of the word Jeremy Dorosin in any search engine and you can read all about it.

The point that needs to be raised here is:

Can the customer be used like a whore? Use them and discard them when you feel like. Is he just a number; the more you have the better is your bottom line.

Or is the customer going to be an important component around which your business revolves.

Would you like to shortchange the customer for your short term profits?

Do you react differently to your customer and you as a customer?

Is your entire organization designed to revolve around the customer or only your Sales and Customer Care have to think about them and rest of the organization is trying to beat the customer orientation by an accountant mind set.

These are just the basic questions you need to ask yourself if you want to survive and profit from business. As Peter Drucker said almost 50 years back, Customer is Business.

Decide whether you want run a business or run out of it by forgetting the customer.