Singapore Online Community Consumer Motivation

Being a member of Online Community you would know employee job satisfaction is one of the key goals of all successful companies. Happy employees are more loyal to the company and its vision. They go the extra mile to achieve company goals.

Dissatisfied workers experience lower productivity in the workplace, poorer performance, more job stress, and higher turnover rates. Moreover, low job satisfaction can result in low morale and low loyalty to the company itself and to any outside Online Community.

Job satisfaction is defined as the extent to which employees feel self-motivated and satisfied with their job. Employee satisfaction covers the basic concerns and needs of employees, and is essential to the success of any business. Job satisfaction is a combination of intrinsic (kind of work) and extrinsic (working condition) factors. Salary, promotion, work-life balance, recognition and appraisals are important factors to be considered in employee satisfaction.

Vendor Relationship Management Checklist

Make strategic decisions to create a culture of engagement and satisfaction. Engaged employees have a strong sense of purpose and leadership. They add value by pushing limits, driving growth and innovation. Employee satisfaction is one of the key metric that can help determine overall health of an organization, which is why many organizations employ regular surveys to measure and track employee satisfaction over time. As a Online Community you would understand that this is one way to assess whether your team is happy and engaged at work. It is critical for employee retention. Sadly, CulturalManagement has observed that this has decreased significantly over the past twenty years.

At CulturalManagement we guide you on how to easily collect and understand employee feedback to create an action plan that works. Few ways a company can improve employee job satisfaction:

  • Provide a positive working environment.
  • Rewards and recognition.
  • Make work-life balance a priority.
  • Develop skills and potential of workforce.
  • Create open and honest communication channels.

Customer centric selling is a selling process that seeks to sell products to the customer with the aim of ensuring that the interests of the buyer are prioritized. Unlike the traditional approach, this selling process seeks to form long-term relationships between the buyer and the seller by turning the seller into a partner rather than a tormentor. However, it does not seek to overhaul or do away with traditional sales values and tactics. Instead, it seeks to make those values adapt to changing consumer patterns and increased scrutiny from government regulations.

Conversations vs. Presentations

Traditional marketing requires that you go with a script in your head and present it to anyone who cares to listen. Though this worked for a while and still works, customer-centric selling tries to replace this with situational conversations. This means that the seller tries to give this person something that is relevant to a situation that is around them.

Features vs. Benefits

Nowadays, people are more interested about their needs than in the past. For this reason, they seek to relate what the product can do to what they need to be done. This means that instead of telling this person that the laptop weighs only three ounce, you tell that person that the laptop is light and portable. This means that you as a salesperson need to highlight the benefits of the product and how it will help that buyer.

Bottom-up Approach

Another feature about customer-centric sales strategy is that unlike traditional marketing where the salespersons were seen as a group that needs to be managed (since it was a top down approach), effective selling requires that managers rely on feedback from the salesperson to the managing because it is the salespeople who understand the real difficulties of selling the product based on with their challenges, and therefore, the need for adjusting your product to suit the buyer and not the other way round.

Questions

Another unique thing about the customer-centric selling approach is that the seller makes an effort in trying to ask the buyer questions so as to get feedbacks. Here, the seller has not just gone out to recite a couple of features about the product and then give them to a disinterested listener. The seller seeks to show the buyer that he is actually willing to listen to the buyer and then gives him what will be the best. So many people have been able to get valuable information from prospects even though they may not have bought the product, but provided valuable insight as to why the product was not selling in the first place.

As the name suggests, it is important to note that this model for selling is rather new and if you are planning to introduce it to your organization, you may face some stiff resistance to those who are used to the old way of doing things. However, once you try implementing it, you will realize that the benefits of this system far outweigh the challenges.

Stress Management Training Courses

A recipe for successful outsourcing
Success in business relies as much on relationship management as anything, and when it comes to outsourcing this axiom certainly holds. The best outsourced team in the world cannot deliver excellence if projects are "thrown over the wall" with little communication or understanding between the parties.

You would think those of us in the IT world would know this by now.
After all, managing outsourced relationships has been a topic of articles, blogs and conversation since the nineties. Relationships are clearly NOT easy, which explains why everyone from Dear Abby to this newsletter keeps talking about how to handle them.

People naturally develop and work through relationships, but organizations seem to lose that ability. Between planning, flow charts, deadlines, etc., we forget that every project comes down to the people involved. And people are, well -- human. They need to be engaged and involved in their work. They need to feel like a vital part of the team and solution.

Bruce A. Stewart, management advisor and former columnist for Computerworld, wrote that: "Most companies put little time or effort into these (outsourced) relationships..." Yet outsourcing continues to grow, and, Stewart says, "Learning how to deal with the changes outsourcing brings can actually work in our favor." Stewart's article, reprinted on CIO.com, goes on to identify ways to optimize outsourcing relationships.

Our experience has shown a recipe for outsourcing success that closely parallels Stewart's suggestions, and goes a bit further by incorporating accountability as well.

Tips for Successful Outsourcing

  1. Formalize the outsourcing relationship - Create an organizational chart that shows who reports to whom within the scope of the relationship, and how teams and people relate to each other. Use Skype or other methods to meet regularly, share ideas and celebrate successes. Develop contacts deep into each organization so that cultural understanding is not isolated to just a few people.
  2. Commit to the relationship - Stewart rightly points out that commitment can only come with trust, but he also notes that, "... a failure to commit shows up as a lack of success--on both sides of the table." He suggests that companies determine upfront that they are committed to establishing trust, and work from there. What you want, ultimately, is an outsourced team that understands company objectives and can contribute initiatives and knowledge.
  3. Insist on accountability -- on both sides of the relationship - When given ownership of a project, people take responsibility for it.
  4. And with responsibility comes accountability. High-performing teams set guidelines and deadlines, and hold their members accountable to these. When practiced this way, accountability becomes an integral and positive part of team culture - not something that has to be constantly enforced from the top.
  5. Focus on the long-term - There will always be short-term obstacles and set-backs. A good outsourcing relationship can survive these when internal and external team members are committed to the same long-term goals and expectations. As long as these continue to evolve together, the outsourcing team remains valuable, bringing its own history and knowledge that contribute to the bottom line.