Singapore Online Community Consumer Motivation

Being a member of Online Community you would know employee job satisfaction is one of the key goals of all successful companies. Happy employees are more loyal to the company and its vision. They go the extra mile to achieve company goals.

Dissatisfied workers experience lower productivity in the workplace, poorer performance, more job stress, and higher turnover rates. Moreover, low job satisfaction can result in low morale and low loyalty to the company itself and to any outside Online Community.

Job satisfaction is defined as the extent to which employees feel self-motivated and satisfied with their job. Employee satisfaction covers the basic concerns and needs of employees, and is essential to the success of any business. Job satisfaction is a combination of intrinsic (kind of work) and extrinsic (working condition) factors. Salary, promotion, work-life balance, recognition and appraisals are important factors to be considered in employee satisfaction.

Employee Dissatisfaction In The Workplace

Make strategic decisions to create a culture of engagement and satisfaction. Engaged employees have a strong sense of purpose and leadership. They add value by pushing limits, driving growth and innovation. Employee satisfaction is one of the key metric that can help determine overall health of an organization, which is why many organizations employ regular surveys to measure and track employee satisfaction over time. As a Online Community you would understand that this is one way to assess whether your team is happy and engaged at work. It is critical for employee retention. Sadly, CulturalManagement has observed that this has decreased significantly over the past twenty years.

At CulturalManagement we guide you on how to easily collect and understand employee feedback to create an action plan that works. Few ways a company can improve employee job satisfaction:

  • Provide a positive working environment.
  • Rewards and recognition.
  • Make work-life balance a priority.
  • Develop skills and potential of workforce.
  • Create open and honest communication channels.

The Consumer Market comprises all individuals and households who buy or acquire goods and services for personal consumption - for themselves, family, guests, relatives, friends.

Consumer Buying Behaviour refers to the buying behaviour of final consumers (individuals & households) who buy goods and services for personal consumption. We need to understand consumer behaviour to answer the question: "How do consumers respond to marketing efforts the company might use?"

The buying Decision Process consists of five steps: Recognition of Need, Information Search, Evaluation of Alternatives, Purchase Decision and Post-Purchase Behaviour / Evaluation.

Factors Influencing Consumer Behaviour

Personal Factors
Age
Life cycle stage
Occupation
Economic situation
Personality & Self Concept
Life style identification

Psychological Factors
Motivation: a need becomes a motive when it is strong enough to propel us to act, to seek satisfaction
Perception: process by which we select, organize and interpret information to form a picture of the world
Learning: changes in behaviour arising from experience
Beliefs: a descriptive thought about something
Attitudes: consistent / enduring favourable / unfavourable evaluations, feelings, and tendencies towards something

Freud's Theory: A motive (or drive) is a need that is sufficiently pressing to direct the person to seek satisfaction. Sigmund Freud assumed people are largely unconscious about the real psychological forces shaping their behaviour... He saw the person as growing up and repressing many urges - these are never eliminated or under perfect control - they emerge in dreams, in slips of the tongue, in neurotic and obsessive behaviour or ultimately in psychoses. Freud suggested that a person does not fully understand his or her motivation.

Frederick Herzberg's two factor theory of satisfiers and dissatisfiers states that the absence of dissatisfiers is not enough - satisfiers must also be present for products to be purchased. In other words, marketers should do their best to avoid dissatisfiers, while identifying major satisfiers or motivators and providing them.

Social Factors
Family is the most important consumer buying unit in any society or market... family members being the most important / influential primary reference group.
Family of orientation: parents, siblings - strong influence on consumption habits that last a lifetime.
Family of procreation: spouse, children - where there are issues of dominance and influence in decision including purchase and consumption.

Reference Groups are groups with whom a person associates and who influence the person's attitudes, values, behaviour, consumption habits... Membership group are those that have a direct influence.
Primary group: continuous, informal interaction - family, friends, neighbours, colleagues
Secondary group: religious, professional, trade union...
Aspirational group: those a person hopes to join
Dissociative group: those whose values or behaviour a person rejects

Social Roles & Status: A role consists of activities a person is expected to perform in society. Each role carries a status. People select products & brands that reflect their role and actual / desired status in society. Marketers need to be aware of the status symbol potential of products & brands.

How Do You Develop Resilience

It's easy to be ethnocentric about customer-centricity! Enthnocentrism is the tendency to look at the world primarily from the perspective of one's own culture. How often do we view customer experience, loyalty, word-of-mouth marketing, and customer care from the perspective of our own company culture? I'd venture to say "too often"!

In the name of customer advocacy, we tend to have a number of exciting customer relationship-building programs in place: advisory boards, user groups, reference programs, satisfaction surveys, experiential marketing, personalized customer communications, and much more. These are indeed useful efforts -- but their usefulness is exponential when we put aside ethnocentrism for true customer-centrism. The key is in examining our motives.

Ethnocentric Customer Advocacy

Inside-out advocacy seeks to build customer relationships through these primary motives: design new products, obtain new customers, up-sell and cross-sell current customers, determine employee bonuses, and so forth. These motivations are ethnocentric because they are essentially self-serving. Sure, the customer may benefit along the way, but the focus is foremost on company revenue. With this focus, the benefits to customers are short-term at best. And the company's outreach efforts must be constant to keep the wheel moving.

True Customer-centric Customer Advocacy

Outside-in advocacy seeks to build customer relationships through these primary motives: make it easier and nicer for customers to get and use the solutions we offer. With those primary motives securely in place, secondary motives may include: design new products, obtain new customers, up-sell and cross-sell current customers, determine employee bonuses, and so forth. The company will certainly benefit along the way, but the focus is foremost on customers' ease. With this focus, the benefits to customers are long-term and self-sustaining. By making it easier and nicer for customers to get and use the solutions we offer, our ambivalent customers are more likely to migrate to brand enthusiasts, positive word-of-mouth accelerates, and both revenue and profit growth are sustainable in an almost auto-pilot mode, relative to the ethnocentric motives scenario.

Waste of Inward Focus

An executive once told me he'd be glad if his company had only manufacturing and sales functions -- just the bare minimum to make and sell solutions for customers. He was really commenting on the excessive inward focus and waste that tends to occur in companies. Certainly, customers expect additional services around the solutions they buy: safety, quality, financing, upgrades and innovations, and so on. And that's why companies exist -- to make and sell whole solutions for customers. After all, it's the customers who make our payroll dollars possible! And truly customer-centric companies keep that thought at the forefront, with pure primary motives to make it easier and nicer for customers to get the solutions they need.

Customer Experience Management

Customer experience management (CEM) is an essential methodology for being a truly customer-centric firm. CEM brings an outside-in focus and pure motives to all groups within the firm. It's the key to creating strong customer perceived differentiation from the competition, as truly customer-centric customer advocacy encompasses the customer's full experience spectrum. CEM makes it easier and nicer for customers to get and use solutions.

Ethnocentric customer-centricity is easy to fall into! Executive champions must be on the alert to prevent it. Outside-in motives prevent waste and and generate big results. The usefulness of any customer relationship building program is exponential when we put aside ethnocentrism for true customer-centrism.